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PHYSICS

A LEVEL

We can't slow down time - but we can show you how to get there faster.

“How” is the nature of Physics.

  • How did the universe begin?
  • How will it change?
  • How does the Sun keep on shining?

Physics is the knowledge of nature.

  • Chemistry deals with results.
  • Biology the why.
  • But it is always incumbent on Physicists to know the how.

Take a car.

  • Biologists wonders why it moves and studies its engine, brakes and powertrain
  • Chemists might ask what would happen if a different fuel was used
  • Physicist want to know how it moves – studying such concepts as velocity and friction

Physics impacts everything we do. From sending reusable rockets into space, to treating cancer through radiotherapy.

All sports equipment has been designed using principles of Physics. Computer games also rely on them, as does the structural stability of skyscrapers as they withstand earthquakes. 

Physics is the study of matter, energy, and the interaction between them, but what that really means is that Physics is about asking fundamental questions and trying to answer them by observing and experimenting.

You’ll learn about the many branches of Physics studying different forms of matter and energy in space and time.

Acoustic (sound), astronomy (space), astrophysics (physical properties of objects in space), optics (properties and behaviour of light), thermodynamics (heat, energy and work), geophysics (shape, structure and composition of earth), and atomic physics (atoms) have.

Physics is the oldest science and the core of experimental sciences including medicine, architecture and meteorology, and engineering disciplines.

You’ll need to be fascinated by mathematics to thrive in Physics

Maths teaches you the tools and how to use them. In Physics you’ll learn what to do with them, building things and applying maths to real challenges.

You might have heard the Physics A Level is particularly hard. We’ve been teaching Physics for many years and developed some inspired techniques to help all the concepts sink in. You’ll be applying Physics principles to our everyday lives to bring them to life. And get you ready with confidence with your exams, and for a future better understanding how our world works.

And then you can work alongside other physicists on an endless number of unsolved puzzles, including:

  • How electrical charge and gravity works
  • Finding a way to match predictions and measurements for vacuum energy and Hubble constant
  • Solving the mysteries of uniting quantum mechanics and gravitation

LESSON TIME!

If you’re looking for a subject that resonates, you’re in the right place.

Today’s lesson will study standing waves – part of Module 5, that you’ll study in Upper Sixth, and resonance.

The pendulum is a great place to start studying waves.

We’ll discuss some simple equations determining the frequency of wavelengths before demonstrating a fun experiment where by increasing a frequency of a wave we can grow the number of anti nodes.

Then we’ll look at an oscillator connected to a signal generator and study how an object moves as the amplitude changes.

And explore resonance – as the object experiences a forced vibration equal to its natural frequency and increases its amplitude.

Buildings will oscillate when presented with high winds, or the force of stresses on a fault – otherwise known as earthquakes.

You don’t want resonance occurring on a building since it will start vibrating with increasing amplitude. Which is why seismic engineering solutions are required. Motion dampers containing oil are set into these high buildings, whose foundations are sat on shock absorbers – which can be as simple as blocks of rubber. Energy is soaked up by these modifications and skyscrapers continue to stand tall. Physics provides alternative methods of energy absorption in buildings – introducing mesh structures, which help prevent buckling. 

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What’s next?

Accordion Content

Science communicators are becoming ever-more important to our world. Not only as members of the academic community – but also in the private sector. As we become more dependent on technology to power the world, we need people conversant in scientific principles to help others to understand and operate in fast-moving environments.

  • Acoustic consultant
  • Astronomer
  • Clinical scientist
  • Geophysicist
  • Metallurgist
  • Meteorologist
  • Nanotechnologist
  • Radiation protection practitioner
  • Research scientist
  • Sound engineer
  • Technical author

The majority of Physics students successfully gain places at Russell Group universities.

Popular degrees include:

  • Pure and Applied Physics
  • Engineering
  • Material Science
  • Computer Science
  • Medicine
  • Dentistry
  • Pharmacy
  • Veterinary Science
  • Optics
  • Finance
  • Law
  • Architecture
  • Journalism
Module 1:

Development of Practical Skills

Module 2:

Foundations of Physics

Module 3:

Forces and Motion

Module 4:

Electrons, Waves and Photons

Module 5:

Newtonian World and Astrophysics

Module 6:

Particles and Medical Physics

 
Entry requirements:

Six good passes at GCSE including two at grade 6 or above

Course specific entry requirements:

Grade 6,6,6 from two Sciences and Maths

If you wish to take two Science A-levels, you need Grade 7,6,6 from two Sciences and Maths

Course duration:

2 years

Assessment methods:

Exams and a practical endorsement

Course type:

Linear A-level

Exam board:

OCR

In Physics lessons, you can expect a range of teaching techniques such as powerpoint presentations, animations, short videos and group work on practical tasks. Problem solving skills are reinforced by regularly practising past exam questions.

You will gain formal feedback on your progress through weekly assessments. If skills are identified that need further development, you will be directed to relevant independent learning tasks. To further assist you with your understanding and application of Physics, teachers are available several times each week during targeted subject support sessions or by arrangement at a mutually agreed time.

Extension tasks for each topic area stretch the most able students beyond the A-level syllabus and prepare them for challenging university interview questions at prestigious universities such as Oxford and Cambridge.

I’ve really enjoyed my time at College and have especially enjoyed Physics, as I want to pursue a career in Astrophysics in the future. My most memorable moment was achieving all five of my acceptances from universities, with the help and support of Xaverian staff, to give me options for where I want to study next.

Ashina Sadaf, Physics A Level

RELATED COURSES

If you’re considering PHYSICS you might also want to check out:

Philosophy, Ethics and Theology

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